For many, the Fujifilm X-T2 may seem like it has been around forever. And in the world of digital cameras, it kind of has been.

As the X-T2 approaches its 7th birthday, Fujifilm’s X-T line of mirrorless cameras has now seen its 5th flagship join its ranks. Fuji’s line of X-Mount lenses have evolved at a similar rate, which has made the X-T2 an even more powerful camera than when it was released.

Full disclosure, the X-T2 is currently my main camera and despite the progress Fujifilm has made in terms of camera specs, particularly those announced in last year’s release of the Fujifilm X-T5, I don’t see any need to upgrade any time soon. For my photography (and, admittedly, my budget), the Fuji X-T2 remains the perfect camera.

Now, with that completely impartial introduction out of the way, let’s discuss the Fujifilm X-T2, along with the good, the bad, and everything in between.

Affiliate disclosure: While we do receive a small kick-back from any sales or leads obtained through our article, this has never and will never affect any of the content posted on our site. At Roamer Photography, we only recommend products that we have used extensively and would pay for ourselves, so while our affiliate links do help us out, these products are never included in our content for the sole purpose of generating income.

Fujifilm X-T2 front

The Fuji X-T2 was released in July 2016 as the first successor to the disruptive X-T1, which had taken the mirrorless camera sector by storm following its release in 2014. The X-T2 became Fuji’s new flagship, improving on almost every aspect in which we would now see the X-T1 to be lacking. But the thing is, at the time, it wasn’t.

The Fujifilm X-T2 wasn’t correcting errors that were made when the Fujifilm X-T1 was designed; it was breaking new ground with the features it presented, arguably establishing it as the best pro-level APS-C sensor camera on the market at the time.

It is these features and technical specs, coupled with its price on the second-hand market that, in my view, make the Fujifilm X-T2 an incredible camera to own in 2024. Let’s briefly chat about what those features are.

 

Fujifilm X-T1 vs X-T2 – features and specs

 

To add a little context to the features with which the X-T2 was released, let’s compare the X-T2 with its older brother, the Fujifilm X-T1.

Fujifilm X-T1

Fujifilm X-T1

16MP – APS-C CMOS X-TRANS II Sensor

ISO 200 – 6400 (extends to 100 – 51200)

3.00″ Tilting Screen

8.0fps continuous shooting

Full HD – 1920 x 1080 video resolution

Max mechanical shutter speed of 1/4000s

Max electronic shutter speed of 1/32000s

440g. 129 x 90 x 47 mm

Fujifilm X-T2

Fujifilm X-T2 sensor

24MP – APS-C CMOS X-TRANS III Sensor

ISO 200 – 12800 (extends to 100 – 51200)

3.20″ Tilting Screen

14.0fps continuous shooting

4K (UHD) – 3840 x 2160 video resolution

Max mechanical shutter speed of 1/8000s

Max electronic shutter speed of 1/32000s

507g. 133 x 92 x 49 mm

Both the Fuji X-T1 and the X-T2 also came with the same large 0.48-inch, 2.36 million dot OLED viewfinder, full weather-sealing (when paired with a similarly weather-sealed lens) and, of course, full RAW shooting capabilities.

The Fujifilm X-T2, however, introduced additional features and improvements such as an extra SD-card slot, which can be an absolute lifesaver in case one of your cards gets corrupted or damaged, as well as the ability to focus bracket and connect an off-camera flash unit using a flash sync port.

These features, in addition to those listed in the table above, give a clear indication of just how far Fujifilm were able to improve on the X-T1 in just two years following its release.

 

Pros – what’s to love about the Fuji X-T2

 

As with any camera, the Fujifilm X-T2 has its strengths and weaknesses. Let’s begin with what there is to love about the X-T2.

 

Sensor size

 

As previously mentioned, the Fuji X-T2 is built around a fantastic 24.3-megapixel APS-C size sensor. Those accustomed to shooting with full-frame kits may not see this as a pro – until they experience how much smaller and lighter the crop-sensor equivalent of their full-frame kit is, all while retaining great image quality.

To illustrate this, I took the image below using my X-T2 after a short hike to the summit of Pidurangala, which overlooks Lion’s Rock in Sigiriya, Sri Lanka. The second image is a cropped version of the first and as you can see, the image remains sharp even though it has been cropped and later downsized for online use.

Sigiriya full X-T2
Sigiriya cropped X-T2

If you travel or hike a lot, or you just like to take your camera out and about with you, the lesser weight of an APS-C kit will make a world of difference. While its portability does come at the sacrifice of some image quality, unless your intent is to shoot for bill-board size prints, the results you can get from the X-T2 will be more than enough. For reasonably sized prints or for sharing online, the Fujifilm X-T2’s APS-C sensor will not disappoint.

 

It can take a beating

 

Now that we’ve mentioned that the Fuji X-T2’s sensor allows for some serious cuts in both the size and weight of the camera body and Fujifilm’s X-Mount lenses, we can touch upon another great quality of the X-T2 from a travel photography perspective: it is one tough camera.

The Fujifilm X-T2 comes equipped with full weather-sealing, meaning that you don’t have to think twice about taking it out on a rainy hike in Scotland, a dusty desert tour in Morocco or a mountaineering trip in the Himalayas. When coupled with one of Fujifilm’s world-class weather-proof lenses (with a personal favourite being the Fujinon XF23mm f/2 WR), the Fujifilm X-T2 is not a camera you have to cradle and protect – another fantastic quality for travel photographers.

 

Manual dials

Now this is more of a general Fujifilm X-T line benefit than it is specifically a benefit of the X-T2, but it should be mentioned nonetheless. Fujifilm’s full set of manual dials allow the photographer to see and adjust their settings instantly without needing to delve into the settings menu to make adjustments.

The Fujifilm X-T2 also improved on the X-T1 in this regard by changing the manual dial’s locking mechanism. The X-T1, just like the X-Pro1, locked the shutter speed dial when it was set to ‘A’ or ‘aperture priority’. The button would then have to be pressed and turned simultaneously to release it from this lock.

The X-T2 has made the button at the centre of the dial accessible from any setting, meaning the dials can be locked or unlocked with a quick press, regardless if you’re shooting in automatic or not.

Fujifilm X-T2 Manual control dials

Autofocus

 

A lightning-fast and accurate autofocus system is not something that Fujifilm is necessarily known for. In fact, it used to be known for the exact opposite. The Fujifilm X-T1 changed this when it was released with its hybrid autofocusing system, which shortly after received an additional boost through a firmware update that followed.

The Fujifilm X-T2 then followed this up by completely blowing the X-T1 out of the water. While the X-T1 boasted 49 autofocus points, with 9 of these points being for phase detection, the X-T2 was designed with a far more substantial 325 autofocus points, with 91 points for phase detection.

In practise, this allows for much faster and more accurate autofocusing capabilities. While these are not exactly best-in-class anymore, the X-T2’s autofocus remains one of its strengths to this day.

 

Lens selection

 

Another general benefit (that we may have mentioned once or twice) is the expansive selection of well-built and powerful lenses available to Fuji X-Mount photographers. There are lenses in Fujifilm’s arsenal to suit any photographer with any style.

Fujifilm currently have a whopping 38 different X-Mount compatible lenses available on their website. Additionally, there are numerous third-party manufacturers selling X-Mount lenses that offer even more variety and choice when it comes to completing a Fuji X-Mount kit.

If you’re interested in seeing some of the lenses that are available, why not take a look at one of our recent articles listing the best Fuji X-Mount lenses in 2024?

 

Image quality

 

As we have touched upon, the Fujifilm X-T2’s image quality is absolutely incredible, especially when considering the fact that it’s built around a crop sensor. When shooting in JPEG, you can get sharp and noise-free results all the way up to around 6400 ISO, allowing the Fuji X-T2 to comfortably hold its own even in dimly lit environments.

Banaue

Price

 

A few years ago, there is no way that price would have made it into the ‘pro’ section of any article like this. When the X-T2 was unveiled as the new flagship of the X-T line, it was released at an eye-watering $1,600 for the body only. With the kit lens, you could expect to pay an additional $300 on top of that. Once you had invested in some SD cards and optional accessories, that total would likely have surpassed $2000.

Luckily, it’s not 2016 anymore and the X-T2 can be bought for a mere fraction of the price it cost when it was new. I snapped up a spotless Fujifilm X-T2 body on eBay for just £375, which is equivalent to around $455 at the time of writing. I bought my X-T2 in early 2020 (great timing for travel photography), so less than 4 years after it would have cost me close to quadruple that price.

Today, somehow, the X-T2 can be found on the second-hand market for even less than the more compact and less powerful X-T20. For this reason, the Fujifilm X-T2 remains, in my opinion at least, one of the best deals to be had in the used Fujifilm X-Mount market.

 

Cons – what might make some think twice about the Fuji X-T2

 

Now that we’ve droned on at length about why we love the Fujifilm X-T2, let’s jump into reasons it may not be the best camera for some photographers.

Sensor size

 

As we’ve briefly touched on, the sensor size can be a pro or a con depending on who you ask. While the smaller sensor, as thus smaller and lighter kit overall, is a huge benefit for those of us wanting to travel light, it does compromise on some aspects that power-users and professionals may well rely on.

For most users, however, and especially those who practise travel photography to be shared online, in magazines or for reasonably sized prints, the Fujifilm X-T2’s sensor will be up to any task that’s thrown at it.

 

Shallow grip

Fujifilm X-T2 sensor

This is a bit of a personal pet peeve, but thankfully, not one without an inexpensive solution.

While the X-T2 improved on the barely existent grip of the X-T1, it still doesn’t stand out in this regard. Many photographers, especially those coming from using much larger and heftier DSLR set-ups, prefer to have a deeper grip for their right hand so that the camera feels more secure when it is held.

This is especially true for those with larger hands, for whom cameras with a smaller grip can feel a bit flimsier, making it harder to get a secure grip on it.

The inexpensive solution I mentioned is to buy a cheap handgrip that attaches to the Fuji X-T2’s body by screwing into the tripod mount. I picked up mine for around £6 on eBay, and it came with the added benefit that the bottom plate also seamlessly clips onto my Manfrotto tripod.

 

Lacks internal image stabilisation

 

Another area in which the X-T2’s relative age shows through is the lack of in-body image stabilisation (IBIS). Fujifilm didn’t introduce in-body image stabilisation until the release of the Fujifilm X-T4 in 2020. It allows the Fuji X-T4 to provide up to 6.5 stops of image stabilisation.

That being said, many of Fujifilm’s lenses now feature optical image stabilisation which can ensure that you are able to take sharp, hand-held images at slower shutter speeds. Using my Fujifilm X-T2 coupled with my Fujinon XF10-24mm f/4, I can take sharp images at shutter speeds as slow as 1/8th of a second.

 

Lack of a touch screen

 

Another design choice that may turn some off the Fujifilm X-T2 is the lack of a touch screen. This was something Fujifilm quickly rectified when they released the X-T3.

Of course, whether the lack of a touchscreen is seen as a negligible omission or a dealbreaker depends largely on how you intend to use the camera. A touch screen can improve the general user experience and can be useful when selecting a focus point.

However, those of us who primarily use the viewfinder to compose a shot and focus manually most of the time may even see the lack of a touch screen as a good thing. Anyone that’s repeatedly opened the settings menu with their nose when using a centrally placed viewfinder will know exactly what I mean.

 

Rear screen articulation

 

The final point in my list of the X-T2’s shortcomings is one that’s likely to be the most divisive. This is something that Fujifilm, in my view, improved upon when they released the Fujifilm X-T4, before backtracking with the X-T5. That design feature introduced with the X-T4 was a fully articulating rear screen.

The Fujifilm X-T2’s rear screen can be tilted upwards by around 90° to facilitate waist-level landscape shooting, and by about 45° when shooting in portrait more. The Fujifilm X-T4 introduced a fully articulating screen which could even be flipped out completely, so it was fully visible with the lens pointed towards you.

This made it more flexible for those intending to use the Fuji X-T4 for videography, and it also meant that the screen could be folded back into the rest of the camera body with the screen facing into the camera.

This is an option I would personally love to have on the X-T2 as I primarily use the viewfinder – I very rarely use the screen unless I’m reviewing shots I’ve taken or I’m editing something in the settings menu. It provides an extra level of protection for the display whenever it is not in use.

 

Head to heads

Fujifilm X-T4 rear screen

Fujifilm X-T4 rear screen

Now that we’ve covered the pros and cons of the Fujifilm X-T2, let’s compare it to some of the other Fujifilm X-Mount cameras you may be considering alongside it. We’ve already compared the Fuji X-T2 to its predecessor, the X-T1, so let’s begin this section with its successor, the Fujifilm X-T3.

 

Fujifilm X-T2 vs X-T3

 

Comparing the Fujifilm X-T2 to the X-T3 seems like a good place to start. In terms of specs the Fujifilm X-T3 is, of course, the more powerful and feature-rich camera. The question to ask is whether this spec bump provides enough additional value to your particular style of shooting to justify the extra cost. 

Fujifilm X-T2

Fujifilm X-T2 sensor

24MP – APS-C CMOS X-TRANS III Sensor

ISO 200 – 12800 (extends to 100 – 51200)

3.20″ Tilting Screen

2360k dot electronic viewfinder

14.0fps continuous shooting

4K (UHD) – 3840 x 2160 video resolution

Max mechanical shutter speed of 1/8000s

Max electronic shutter speed of 1/32000s

507g. 133 x 92 x 49 mm

Fujifilm X-T3

Fujifilm X-T3

26MP – APS-C X-Trans CMOS 4 Sensor

ISO 160 – 12800 (extends to 80 – 51200)

3.00″ Tilting Screen

3690k dot electronic viewfinder

11.0fps (20.0fps Electronic) continuous shooting

4K (DCI) – 4096 x 2160 video resolution

Max mechanical shutter speed of 1/8000s

Max electronic shutter speed of 1/32000s

539g. 133 x 93 x 59 mm

Of course, the Fujifilm X-T3 improves on the X-T2 in a few notable ways, such as an updated and improved sensor, which uses BSI (backside illumination) technology, which allows it to take in more light, resulting in greater dynamic range and low light performance when compared with the Fuji X-T2.

The Fujifilm X-T3 also introduced an updated, higher definition viewfinder, as well as touch sensitivity for the rear monitor. This will be a big selling point for a lot of photographers as being able to tap the screen to select a focus point is far easier and quicker than selecting that point using the X-T2’s joystick controls.

Photographers for whom the Fuji X-T2’s autofocusing feels a tad sluggish would also be happy about the improved autofocusing system included in the X-T3. Fujifilm claim that they were able to improve auto-focusing speeds by up to 150%.

These additional features and improvements will likely be enough to sway many photographers towards the X-T3 as opposed to the X-T2. While going for the newer model may seem like the safer option, important thing to consider is the extent to which the additional features are of value to your intended use of the camera.

 

Fujifilm X-T2 vs X-T20

 

Finally, let’s take a look at another Fujifilm X-Mount camera with some very similar specs and even a very similar name. While there are a lot of similarities between the Fujifilm X-T2 and the X-T20, there are also some stark differences that may well sway some from one to the other.

Fujifilm X-T2

Fujifilm X-T2 sensor

24MP – APS-C CMOS X-TRANS III Sensor

ISO 200 – 12800 (extends to 100 – 51200)

3.20″ Tilting Screen

2360k dot electronic viewfinder

14.0fps continuous shooting

4K (UHD) – 3840 x 2160 video resolution

Max mechanical shutter speed of 1/8000s

Max electronic shutter speed of 1/32000s

507g. 133 x 92 x 49 mm

Fujifilm X-T20

Fujifilm X-T20

24MP – APS-C CMOS X-TRANS III Sensor

ISO 200 – 12800 (extends to 100 – 51200)

3.00″ Tilting Screen

2360k dot electronic viewfinder

14.0fps continuous shooting

4K (UHD) – 3840 x 2160 video resolution

Max mechanical shutter speed of 1/4000s

Max electronic shutter speed of 1/32000s

383g. 118 x 83 x 41 mm

You’d be forgiven for thinking that we may have made a mistake in writing out the specifications in the table above. You’ll likely have noticed that besides the larger screen, the maximum mechanical shutter speed and the physical size and weight of these cameras, their internal components and specifications are almost identical.

Their externals, however, are what make it clear that these two cameras are aimed at two different types of photographers; while the X-T20 is a great and powerful all-rounder, the Fujifilm X-T2 is clearly aimed towards more professional-level use.

One aspect of the Fujifilm X-T20 that many would find extremely useful, however, is its inclusion of a built-in flash, meaning that there is no need to carry an external flash unit as you would need to with the Fuji X-T2.

That being said, there are some things that X-T2 users are likely to miss if they were to switch to an X-T20. The first potential sticking point may be the Fujifilm X-T20’s dials: it lacks an ISO dial and metering control, meaning that these either have to be changed from within the settings menu or a function button has to be assigned to alter these. Moreover, the X-T20 lacks any sort of locking mechanism for its dials, so knocking and accidentally altering them seems more likely.

The Fujifilm X-T20 also only has a single SD card slot, meaning that there is no option of keeping an additional back up in case one SD card is damaged or corrupted. This can be fairly risky and may mean that images need to be backed up more often just in case, which can be a bit of an annoyance.

Arguably the most notable difference, in my opinion at least, is that the Fujifilm X-T2 has full weather sealing, while the X-T20 has none of any kind. The Fuji X-T2 is dust-proof, splash-proof, and freeze-proof down to -10° Celsius (or 14 degrees Fahrenheit). When paired with a weather-proof lens, the Fujifilm X-T2 is a tough camera to accidentally break, while the X-T20 is unlikely to stand up to anything past a light drizzle. This is what makes the Fujifilm X-T2 stand out in comparison, particularly for those who intend to use their camera whilst travelling or more generally when in the outdoors.

 

Why the Fuji X-T2 is among the best deals for travel photographers in 2024

 

As you can likely tell by this point, the Fujifilm X-T2 is a camera that I, as a current owner and user, and extremely fond of. Honestly, the biggest factor that is likely to cause me to upgrade at some point is the lack of high-quality underwater housings that are available for the X-T2.

For travel photography, however, I would say the Fuji X-T2 is perfect for the vast majority of photographers. Despite its pro-level features, it remains fairly light and compact, and with the large selection of high-quality lenses available, it’s easy to build yourself an incredibly versatile and powerful system that you won’t break your back trying to carry.

Batad shot on the Fujifilm X-T2
Dahab, Egypt with the Fuji X-T2

On top of this, with the Fuji X-T2, you get a hell of a lot of camera for the money. I sold my Fujifilm X70 along with the WCL-X70 conversion lens back in 2020 so that I could gather the funds to invest in a used Fujifilm X-T2 kit. I bought a like-new quality X-T2 body with the Fujinon XF23mm f/2 with the money I got for my X70, and I actually made a profit.

 

The best accessories for the Fujifilm X-T2

 

Selling my X70 for more than I spent on my X-T2 kit allowed me to invest in a few additional accessories to further improve the experience of using it.

 

A hot-shoe mounted thumb-grip

Hotshoe mount on Fuji X-T2

As I’ve mentioned on my page before, one of the first things I invest in when I buy a new camera is a hot-shoe mounted thumb-grip. For those with larger hands, this helps the camera feel a lot more secure, particularly when you’re operating it with one hand. And at roughly £4 or $5, it’s not much of an investment to have to justify.

Check out the latest prices here.

 

A shutter release remote

Astrophotography in the Philippines with the X-T2

If you enjoy occasionally trying your hand at some long exposure or astrophotography, it’s a good idea to invest in a shutter release cable and remote. Of course, you don’t really need this is you’re happy just using the camera’s inbuilt shutter timer settings, though having a manual release provides a greater level of control in this process.

Check the latest prices here.

 

An additional battery

 

While the Fujifilm X-T2’s battery life isn’t terrible, it’s also not the best-in-class anymore. And even if it was, it’s always a good idea to carry a back-up battery in case you run out, which is particularly useful if you’re travelling a lot or taking your camera out for a long hike.

Check the latest prices here.

Peak Design Capture Clip V3

 

While this is not something I initially bought for my X-T2, it’s something that I’ve started using more recently and I love it so much that I thought it’d be worth to mention it here: it’s the Peak Design Capture Clip V3 (MPB affiliate link).

If you travel a lot, and especially if you frequently hike with your camera, the Capture Clip V3 is a godsend. Anytime I used to hike, I used to carry my camera either in my backpack, meaning that it wasn’t easily accessible, or I’d use a shoulder strap, which would get annoying as the camera bounced around and would risk damage when scrambling up steeper terrain.

Even when using the shoulder strap, I always found myself with one hand stopping the camera from moving around, so I was never truly handsfree. The Capture Clip V3 changed this; it allows me to keep my hands free whilst never having to worry about my camera knocking glass-first into a boulder.

While there are cheaper versions available online, I personally think the V3 is worth every penny. After all, if I’m trusting the fate of my camera in something, I don’t mind paying the premium for that peace of mind.

 

Check out the latest prices here.

Peak Design Capture Clip 3

Where to pick up your own

 

If you’re now in agreement that the Fujifilm X-T2 is a great investment in 2024, the next step will inevitably be to navigate the minefield that is the used camera market. Buying a used camera before using and testing it can always be risky, which is why I always look at listings on MPB.com before taking a look at what’s available on eBay.

MPB.com have a team of experts that test all of their equipment and they post real photos of the exact product you will receive, meaning that there won’t be any surprises when your equipment arrives. On top of that, they offer 6 month’s warranty on every item on their site as standard, just for your additional peace of mind.

Click here to take a look at current prices of the Fujifilm X-T2.

Affiliate disclosure: As mentioned before in this post, we do receive a small kick-back from any sales obtained through our article. This will never influence the opinions shared on our site. At Roamer Photography, we only recommend products that we have used extensively and would pay for ourselves, so while our affiliate links do help us out, these products are never included in our content for the sole purpose of generating income.

Wrapping up

 

So there we have it: a not-so-brief review / opinion piece on what I believe to be one of the best deals available in 2024: the Fujifilm X-T2.

The X-T2 is perfectly suited to a wide range of photographers: from a newer photographer looking for a camera to hone their skills and grow into, to an established professional shooting for magazines and selling prints.

The Fuji X-T2 remains a fantastic all-round contender that, in my opinion at least, should be on the radar of any photographer looking to buy into the Fujifilm eco-system.

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